What differentiates me from most psychotherapists is that I don’t see “neurotic” behavior as pathological.  Instead, I view “neurosis” as the whole organism’s natural response to developmental stress on the path to maturation. 

 

 

 

 

 

I use innovative methods drawn from… humanistic, transpersonal and eastern traditions.  I’m particularly helpful with couples, existential and midlife crisis, and resistance to change.

 

 

 

 

 

…one of the most negative influences is the "sick" label itself, which tightens and distorts, keeping people from a natural unfolding and realignment.  I find that big-picture understanding, active listening and fundamental positive regard work better.

 

 

 

 

 

I define "spiritual" as simply the upper end of normal human development.

 

 

 

 

 

…"healing" takes place only when we… rest at the ground of our being, the better to naturally unfold according to our perfect, internal template for development.

 

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Welcome to my Website. 

I am a psychotherapist and counselor with a private practice in New York City and Sag Harbor, New York.  I take a psychospiritual approach to personal development, healing and change.  In my practice, I employ innovative methods drawn from Psychosynthesis, Imago Relationship Therapy, yoga psychology and other humanistic, transpersonal and eastern traditions.  I’m particularly helpful with couples, existential and midlife crisis, and resistance to change. 

What differentiates me from most psychotherapists is that, over time, I have come to see that behavior labeled “neurotic” is not pathological at all.  Instead, I view “neurosis” as the whole organism’s natural response to developmental stress on the path to maturation.  In my view, “neurosis” is better seen as developmental challenge, the surmounting of which brings maturity – wisdom – rather than as pathology.  Neurochemical, often genetic mental illness, such as schizophrenia, must be treated by psychiatrists (doctors who can prescribe medical, nowadays usually pharmacological, treatment).  I try to return psychology to the study of the unfolding psyche in all it’s beauty and complexity rather than pursue the medical model. 

Another way to say this is that I am rapidly moving away from the words “patient” and "healing." We label people "neurotic," when in reality, it's not a medical illness they are suffering from, but spiritual immaturity.  Psychology is the science of spiritual maturity. 

Here, I’m defining "spiritual" as simply the upper end of normal human development.  I don't make much of a distinction between body and mind, or mind and spirit, but look at them as all part of the whole organism.  An example comes from when my seven year old was learning to walk.  As with all kids, while learning, he would fall on his bottom a lot – but I didn't label it pathological, just normal developmental stages he was navigating.  The fact that he was falling was actually good, as it was his effort honing in on mastery.  It was: fall, fall, fall… walk! He didn't need healing by a helping professional, just his natural resources, a safe environment, and me getting out of the way. 

Another example is that of a rose bud: We could say that it would be nicer if it were open and begin to peel back the petals, but of course that wouldn't work.  Rather, Sun, rain, soil and protection from trauma are all that are required – other than that, let it unfold.  In my practice, I want to be less like a farmer, who plants in a row and harvests systematically, and more like a forest ranger, who keeps a look-out for forest fires and otherwise simply embraces the forest sprawl. 

So I don't believe that the term “neurosis” is in any way accurate or helpful.  I believe one of the most negative influences is the "sick" label itself, which tightens and distorts, keeping people from a natural unfolding and realignment.  I find that big-picture understanding, active listening and fundamental positive regard work better.

From my perspective, "healing" takes place only when we get underneath our modern imago, to rest at the ground of our being, all the better to naturally unfold according to our perfect, inner template for development.  That process both requires – and facilitates – the emergence of self acceptance and will. 

I look forward to working and developing with you. 

— Neal M. Goldsmith, Ph.D. 

Neal M. Goldsmith, Ph.D. 
Sag Harbor (Long Island), NY
631-725-0098
New York (Lower Manhattan), NY
347-743-1110
neal@inch.com

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© 2007  Neal M. Goldsmith, Ph.D.  All rights reserved.